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Shizenki Ryu Karate Association

Premier Issue 

Soke Menkyo Kai

September 2011 Newsletter

 

 

 

Inside Stories

 

1. American Karate?Master Gray’s system-JUST THE BASICS! By: Soke, Jeff Cuevas; p. 3-5.

2. Self-Defense & A Reality Check, By: Soke, Avelino R. Mayoral; p. 6-7.

 

3. Acknowledgement For Those Achievers, By, Soke, Alan Thornton; p. 8.

 

 

 

Note: The S.M.K. Newsletter is published every January, May and September of each year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illustrator & Text Designer:         Avelino R. Mayoral, Soke San Dai, Shizenki Ryu Bujutsu Karate                                                

 

Editor:                                               Avelino R. Mayoral

 

 

Copyright 2011 Soke Menkyo Kai. All rights reserved. Except as permitted by current law, no part of this newsletter may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system mechanically or electronically, without prior written permission of the copyright owner.

Contact: PMB 775, Bldg 645, G Street, Suite 100, Anchorage, AK, 99501

 


AMERICAN KARATE?MASTER GRAY’S SYSTEM

JUST THE BASICS!

 

                                                            By: Soke Jeff Cuevas

 

I am writing the Soke Menkyo Kai to inform you about a new idea and ideology of martial arts that I recently had an epiphany to. It is about the amount of knowledge a practitioner must learn while studying for shodan black belt and how it affects the actual ability in a negative way, in essence, retarding the progress of the student and harming the overall reputation of martial arts.

We all know that guy that has a 10th Dan that knows EVERYTHING about EVERYTHING! But can’t fight his way out of a WET paper bag! This is my point. There is an overabundance of techniques to learn and not enough time to master even just one. For years, I have trained in the arts and hold a high rank in one system or another. I have recently been training with a new Master. After the last two years I have seen his students training in a relaxed setting and I have been disappointed in his student’s ability, let me explain.

When I started training in 1975 I was only 5 years old. I learned the basics of karate, stances, blocks, punches, and kicks for one year before I was allowed to earn up to yellow belt. Today I have seen students of the same age, being promoted to yellow belt in one month! And, the end product is a sloppy, sad, pathetic performance; “Look out for that WET PAPER BAG!”

I would train at home for hours on just ONE technique and I never thought I was good enough, so I pushed myself to be better and better, not these students. And it shows. But why? Is it due to their lack of ability? The lack of commitment? The lack of instruction? Or is it the amount of knowledge one must learn today in many martial art schools? Or all of the above?

It has not escaped my attention that the practitioner must learn not only the basics, but one kata, 5 one step kumite, 5 self defenses, kicking combinations, and sparring techniques, with a whole list of other techniques. That in itself is not bad. What is making the martial art practitioner falter is the amount and the lack of time the martial artist has to learn it all, just one month, it is irresponsible! Not to mention unsafe.

My idea is to instruct the practitioner the skills that they are require and the correct time to learn it. The practitioner in turn masters the knowledge and skills to perform at an appropriate level to ensure good habits of training; thus making a good martial artist and maybe becoming a good Master.

 As I stated, I started in 1975 in American Karate under Master Gray at a local city park and he made sure that his students fully understood the basics before moving on in rank. To this day, I am grateful for his constant vigilance of his teaching of the basics. He did not over load the practitioner with useless techniques and katas. Such as with some martial art styles, that has the practitioner learning 12 katas to reach Shodan. In his American Karate Master Gray had only 5 katas. Some were Korean, others were Japanese all were good for the very basic karate. This is what I wish to start again, simple easy basics no fancy techniques, just the basics, all the way to shodan and beyond!

This is what I learned back in the 70’s and 80’s from American Karate and Master Gray:

  • At the white belt level, I learned the basics, nothing more!
  • At yellow belt I learned, one kata and 5 self defense techniques, nothing more.
  • Orange belt I learned one kata, 5 self defense techniques, and sparring techniques, nothing more.
  • Green belt I learned was one kata, 5 self defense techniques, and sparring techniques, nothing more.
  • Brown Belt I learned, was two katas, 5 self defense techniques, 5 knives self defense techniques, 2 Gun self defense techniques, 2 Club Defense, and Breaking.

From Kyu to Dan Levels:

American Karate how I learned from Master Gray was plain and simple! No jumping butterfly kicks at white belt or flying sidekicks, 360 degree spinning kicks, nothing useless just the basics. I wish to pursue this again with my own rendition of American Karate to teach and learn from myself. A very basic karate style that the practitioner can learn from and be able to defense themselves from all attacks. I currently have 8 kyu grades- white, yellow, orange, green, blue, purple, and brown, for each practitioner to master.

I feel the kyu grades with 3 months requirement in that rank, will be enough time to master the basic skills the practitioner will need to defense themselves.  At the Dan grades the practitioner will learn at a pace that they are comfortable with. Even the Dan grades are kept simple and effective techniques, nothing fancy just the basics!

A secondary idea behind my American Karate is that the practitioner, after learning and obtaining his shodan, will be able to go to another martial art school and learn more effectively and without the fear of their skill level and perform confidently. This should be the main point of all ryu’s and it is not? How I will instruct American Karate will be instructed to all practitioners no matter what their age, sex, or fitness level and it will produce a keener martial artist,

I feel if that most instructors, who spend too much time on the philosophical side of the art, with the oath of martial arts and the tenets the practitioners will have a new overall prospective and respect for their martial art style and thus their life and will become better. The bottom line to all this is, If it was not for Master Gray and his American Karate and his way he teaches the art, only the basics, I would not probably be at the level I am today. And given time, the ability for mastering a style to the prestigious rank and title of Soke is a great possibility.

Do not forget, general psychology and the theory of overload, as it pertains to college learners and their inability to learn; not to mention, what Gichin Funakoshi once said about learning, too many techniques and mastering none, “he who learns a hundred techniques but masters none will lose to the student that has learned and Mastered only one,” I have already started on a syllabus and I have included what I can to get some feed back in the next SMK issue.

 




SELF-DEFENSE AND A REALITY CHECK…

 

                                            By: Soke, Avelino R. Mayoral

 

 

 

Anyone in the martial arts can tell you, you are only as good as the one who has taught you. We must face a few cold hard facts here…most masters in the martial arts do not make it a habit of testing their skills out on the street in a real combat fighting situation. With that said, do they know for absolutely sure can their techniques really work in a fight? Can they hold their own in a situation outside the safe haven of their dojo or a tournament?

 

This brings up an issue of how intelligent you are. How much street smart do you really have when it comes right down to defending yourself? We would like to believe we are warriors! We would like to believe we could hold our own in a real combat situation! Nevertheless, many of these so-called masters have tunnel vision and do not see beyond what they believe is the truth.

 

It is one thing to think that all those years you invested in you martial arts ryu will pay off if you are faced in a life or death situation and you have to fight back. The cold hard truth is, just because you have a gun does not make you a marksman. Just because you have 40-to-50 years as the martial artist does not give you any guarantee for a successful defense in the real world of combat.

 

According to Walter (2003),

…[a]ncient Greek pankratiasts became heroes, and the subject of numerous myths and legends. These include the legends of Arrichion, Dioxxipus, Polydamos and even Hercules was believed to be a pankratiast. Alexander the Great sought out pankratiasts as soldiers because of their legendary skills at unarmed combat. (para. 3)

 

The above mentioned, is said to be the start of Asian martial arts, as most Asian martial arts trace their history to India at around this time. Of course in today’s society, where the typical street thug does not pack a martial arts weapon, but may have a gun, a knife, evens a broken beer bottle and in some cases, has no other notion, but to beat the living life out of you. For what? Maybe a few dollars or for the keys to your car. Would you honestly know what to do? We can only hope we would. Sadly, but true, fights are not won on hopes and dreams.

 

We must face the cold hard truth…fighting is combat. Combat is a confrontation of will. Just think for a moment, the last time you had to seriously defend yourself or one of your love ones.

Reality Check! Self-defense, most instructors do not want to address. Could that be because they may be asked to demonstrate techniques that are nothing more then a mere bunch of fancy movements that take on the resemblance of a dance with kicks and punches.

 

We see it all the time…just pick up any telephone book and turn to the pages to see for yourself. The number of martial arts schools making false claims to teaching effective fighting techniques is not always the truth. Let us stop the lies…if you never were in a fight, how can you honestly say for sure that you can defend yourself? If you depend on those techniques that you have been practicing in the air, in an environment where no one is out to really hurt you, then how do you know for sure you are not just wasting your time?

 

Legitimate self-defense techniques are more then just learning mere punches, kicks, strikes or blocks. Legitimate self-defense is having real confidence in what you could possibly face in a real fight situation. Agree or disagree…take the mindsets of a combat solder…do you believe the men and women in the military go to battle unprepared? Are we forgetting what the word “Martial arts” really mean? Martial arts relates to war. Martial arts does not in any form relate to teaching worthless dance like movements. Pay a dance instructor who is qualified to teach dance and not to teach martial arts.

 

As sokes of our ryu, we face an uphill battle of developing practitioners who can actually defend themselves without putting themselves at risk of being targets. I am not saying you must go out to your local drinking joint; pick a fight with Bruno Crushrock the bouncer of that drinking establishment to test your skills. What I am saying is be realistic. There is nothing worse then an instructor who lives in a fantasy world where the population of his little fantasy world is himself and his practitioners.

 

Reference

 

Walter, D. F. (2003). Mixed martial Arts: Ultimate Sport, or Ultimately Illegal? Retrieved July 10, 2011, from: http://www.grapplearts.com/Mixed-Martial-Arts-1.htm

 

 


 

AKNOWLEDGEMENT FOR THOSE ACHIVERS

 

                                                                By Soke, Alan Thornton,      

 

 

On 10 February 2010, I awarded Soke Professor James (Moclair) the senior rank of 6th Dan (Rokudan) in my 'Senai Seisshinryu Shihandokai' Karate-Do Jutsu & Budo-Jutsu system. This was for his outstanding lifetime contributions and services to the propagation of martial arts on an international basis. James is now the second highest ranking Yudansha within my ryuha and knows several of the katas.

 

On 12 June 2011, I officially awarded him the rank/title of 'Shihan' for his further development as a grandmaster, gentleman and successful author. James' wife (Lorraine) is also a very accomplished Yudansha in various arts taught by James. Lorraine has continued her lifetime training, personal development and commitment within the martial arts to date…I respectfully awarded her the deserved 'honorary' rank of 1st Dan (Shodan) in my ryuha on 12 June 2011.

 

I truly believe that unsung martial artists such as Lorraine Moclair and Paula Whitney (and other senior Yudansha within our own Ryu) - should be given full recognition for their lifetime work by being honored with the coveted 'SMK Samurai Spirit Award’ on future annual occasions. 

 


 

                                                    By Soke, Lewis Whitney

 

 

An Introduction to the Warrior Arts of Hanbo & Tanto


The three foot staff (Hanbo) and knife (Tanto) are often the poor relations to the Katana and Bo. Clearly in most engagements the majority of people would prefer the tempered blade of the katana or the reach of the bo but the minor arts of the Hanbo and Tanto will strengthen of martial principles for any student.

The Hanbo as a three foot staff is called occurs in all warrior cultures across the world, from aboriginal stick fighting to the modern day usage of batons by police forces as a form of non lethal restraint.

The stick comes into it own when used to strike and lock especially as part of our unarmed syllabus, adding additional power to our blocks, greater reach to our strikes and in effect giving us a "third arm". The concept of a third arm should be embraced since use of the stick does not constitute a particular martial art in it's own right, but allows us instead to relate the principles of hard and soft  and distance and timing as well as to experience the inter relatedness of all martial arts.

To simplify; if we employ the properties of the stick - i.e.; wood and its strength - then blocks against incoming punches can be seen as the attacker striking a tree... Just one example of the application of our knowledge and our body’s movement. Endless variations on this theme spring to mind instantly.

As with any martial art in which mind and body should be experienced as a single entity the stick should exist as a third limb in as practical a way as possible. Taking the trouble to become familiar with this system will reward the student with a vast array of ideas and insight to complement their study of the empty hand art.

Important exercises for students include the cleaning and checking of the weapons while the Sensei takes the time to summarize the lesson and/or make some important points. Students should ensure that all weapons are clean and usable but should not regard it as a chore. Rather, it should offer a chance of gaining new insight into their training.

A valuable exercise is to practice rolls, falls and throws while carrying the weapons. It becomes surprising to discover how few students can do a roll of any kind while holding a Hanbo or Tanto.

USAGE:

The staff can be used in one of four ways; to lock, strike, constrict or throw. All parts of an assailant’s body are vulnerable to poking, thrusting or striking in an arc like or circular movement. Strikes should be relaxed and should be achieved in an almost opportunistic way. Especially effective against punches or strikes, they should be aimed at muscle, bone or joint targets.

EXERCISE ONE: Striking

The attack: incoming straight or roundhouse punch.
The defense: step back and strike at whatever target presents itself as the most likely to disable the attacker. There are many possibilities, and targets should be divided between muscle, bone and joints. The purpose of this exercise is to investigate the wide range of possible responses to sense the pace and speed of both attack and defense, to determine the direction of the defensive movement as well as to experience becoming one with the weapon.

EXERCISE TWO: Constricting

The attack: from a straight or roundhouse punch.
The defense: this time step toward or to the side of the attacker and trap the arm or wrist between your body and the Hanbo. Use the Hanbo to constrict the limb. Practice against strikes thrown by both hands. Also watch for targets of opportunity - for example the throat - and practice constricting it also but be extremely careful and only under the supervision of your sensei. Also pay attention to targeting muscle and bone areas.

Locking and Throwing:

Endless variations can be conjured up, in this sense the Hanbo becomes the martial artists "magic wand". In order to fully understand how the Hanbo can be used in locking and throwing it is useful if the student continues to bear in mind the principle of body and weapon as a single entity. Thus the action of trapping and ensnaring the attackers limbs or constricting the torso can be carried out at a great distance or at close quarters - in both cases with greater force and leverage with the use of the Hanbo over empty hand.

 

Remember only by experiencing the use of the Hanbo can confidence and effectiveness be built up. In experiencing the realities of Hanbo training some approaches will prove more effective than others depending on the student’s abilities. Practice, experiment and above all have fun...

 

Second Issue 

Soke Menkyo Kai

January 2012 Newsletter

 

 

 

Inside Stories

 

1. Fear: pages, 4 through 7, by Soke San Dai, Avelino R. Mayoral

2. Hanbo & Tanto, part 2, by Soke Ni Dai, Lewis Whitney

3. Kyoshi, Paula Whitney, By Soke San Dai, Avelino R. Mayoral

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: The S.M.K. Newsletter is published every January, May and September of each year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illustrator & Text Designer:         Avelino R. Mayoral, Soke San Dai, Shizenki Ryu Bujutsu Karate                                          

 

Editor:                                               Avelino R. Mayoral

 

 

Copyright 2011 Soke Menkyo Kai. All rights reserved. Except as permitted by current law, no part of this newsletter may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system mechanically or electronically, without prior written permission of the copyright owner.

Contact: PMB 775, Bldg 645, G Street, Suite 100, Anchorage, AK, 99501

 


Note…

 

Welcome to a brand new year! Seeing that 2011 is now in the past, we as Sokes can look forwarded to a brand new year. As Sokes of our own martial art ryu, it is our duty to develop not only ourselves as leaders in our own ryu, but to develop each and every practitioner who studies under our close watchful eye.

The goal to development is betterment not only in us as a human, but as leaders of our ryu. 2012 will be a better year for most of us. With our lives we face uncertainties and with these uncertainties we can only hope that with time and development, thing get better and make us stronger as humans and as leaders of our martial arts.

I would like to wish each and every one of you only the best for 2012!

Sincerely,

Soke, Avelino R. Mayoral, Hanshi

Menkyo Kaiden, Shizenki Ryu Bujutsu

 


                                 By: Soke San Dai, Avelino R. Mayoral

                                                                   Shizenki Ryu Bujutsu Karate

 

 

Fear…

 

When I was a child I drove my mother crazy by asking her to PLEASE MOM! Let me join karate. My mother felt that her little boy would get injured. This was her reason for taking her time to make up her mind for allowing her me to take karate classes.

 

One must remember, I was born and raised in a very small town in Western New York. Its population was at the time approximately 25,000 people. We were limited by what activities that was available for child that young. I kept myself as a very young child occupied by playing the drums. I started playing the drums in 1960 at the age of 4 years old. Oh how I loved playing the drums. It has now been 52 years later and I still play the drums.

 

My karate training started on January of 1965. I was only 9 years old. Being raised without a father or a big brother, my mother was told by a medical professional, that martial arts training would help in the development of my self-confidence because I was very shy as a child.

 

January 1965, I started training in Shizenki Ryu Bujutsu Karate, under the late Louis Fried. I must admit, I feared the living daylights out of my sensei because I was not used to any male figure telling me what to do or for that matter being in my life. My Sensei saw the fear that I had. He took me under his supervision. It was very difficult for me because not only did I have to face this man three days a week, but he had adult male practitioners that I knew sooner or later that I would be facing in my training.

 

It took approximately a year of training before my fear of my Sensei and the adult males that I faced in his class. I knew even then, at the age of 9 years old, that my fear of adult males must be overcome in order for me to become the martial artist that I was seeking to become.

 

As a child, I would encounter bullies and was forced into having to fight. A matter of fact, I was getting into fights almost one a week. I did not fear getting beat up by these bullies because I knew that being in karate, fighting these bullies back allowed for me to test my fighting skills. I do not endorse getting into fights just so you can test your martial art skills. I do however believe you should not ever stand there and become someone’s punching bag.

 

My environment as a child basically was me being the protector of my younger brothers and sisters. I had to learn quickly that you could not have fear. My Sensei would always know (so how) that I got into fights. He always told me, “If you must fight, win!” Facing my fears with developmental skills which give me the self-confidence to face lives challenges.

 

Fear can hold one back from any achievements that they may try to obtain. No matter what, as long as we are humans, we have fears. Fear is good because once you over come what ever it maybe that you fear, it is a great feeling to know you have the self-confidence to face any or all your fears. Fear is a reaction to danger that involves both the mind and body. It can serve a protective purpose, signaling us of danger and preparing us to deal with it, or it can be disruptive.

Fear is a built-in survival mechanism with which we are all equipped. Fear is a normal human emotional reaction. Even as babies, we possess the survival instincts necessary to respond when we sense danger.

A fear reaction happens whenever we sense danger or when we are confronted with something new or unknown that seems potentially dangerous. Most people tend to avoid the things they feel afraid of. There are, of course, exceptions such as people who seek out the thrill of extreme sports because the rush of fear can be exciting. We all experience fear slightly differently and with more or less intensity.

When faced with danger, our sympathetic nervous system produces adrenaline. This excess adrenaline prepares us to fight or to flee the physical threat. The fight-or-flight response includes an increase in heart rate and blood flow to our large muscles, better enabling us to react to the emergency. Blood sugar also increases, providing us with more energy. With our bodies and minds alert and ready for action, we are able to respond quickly and protect ourselves.

Although it is normal and even helpful to experience fear in dangerous situations, with phobias the fear and danger are greatly exaggerated or imagined. For example, it is only natural to be afraid of a snarling dog, but it is irrational to be terrified of a small, tail wagging puppy.

Fear is a reaction to danger that involves both the mind and body. It can serve a protective purpose, signaling us of danger and preparing us to deal with it, or it can be disruptive. However, the more we comprehend what it maybe that we fear, the more self-confidence we develop, the greater we face the challenge of facing our fear.

Most practitioners of the martial arts know that fighting skills are absolutely fantastic to have in the event of any self-defense encounter. We as practitioners know what we are mentally and physically capable of in a self-defense encounter. The fear often can take place when you do not know what the situation at hand may have waiting for you.

We all at sometime in our life seen, read about, another person was shoot, stabbed and killed…often times for reasons that could have been avoided. The whole idea behide any legitimate martial artist is knowledge. It may sound quite plan and simple, but all the skills in the world cannot prepare one for real combat if he or she lacks knowledge of today’s street fighter.

The fear of being attacked is a legitimate reason to over come any barriers that can hold us from defending ourselves and our love ones. Something as simple as me (Avelino R. Mayoral) having the fear of adult males as a child was over come by developing self-confidence. Facing our fears can be difficult, but we can over come all most anything we as human have to face in life.

Everyday we face some form of lives challenge. I for one know this first had…since January of 2008, I experienced a very serious health issue that almost too my life. Here I was 52 years old. My doctor at Elmendorf air Force Base hospital took various tests to see why I was in such excruciating pain in my lower abdomen and groin.

Once the results came back to my doctor, he discovered that I needed emergency surgery. Oh he gave me a choice…one was to have the surgery the other was to order me pain killers and send me home and within three day he told me I would be found dead by my wife.

Fear of dying hit me like a ton of bricks! I did not want to die. Within approximately a half hour, I was in the operating room. I woke up in the intensive care unit of Elmendorf Air Force Hospital and I was on a 24 hour watch, meaning a nurse was in my room for 24 hours. This first surgery marked a pathway for six other surgeries that I had to face. You talk about fear! Most people in their life time may never face even one surgery. For those who do face serious surgeries as I did, there is always complication. I am now over with all my surgeries and slowly recovering.

 Since January of 2008, I have lived with a colostomy bag! Then on my fifth surgery I underwent an eight hour surgery to have what is called a colostomy reversal. Meaning I no longer had to live with passing all my bowel moments in a colostomy bag. However because I also experienced fistulas, my surgeon had to remove 12 inches of my colon. He gave me an ileostomy. Meaning I was passing all my bowel moments into a colostomy bag, but my bowel was coming from my small intestines and not from my colon as to where I was passing all bowel moments from the colon into a colostomy bag.

I faced seven surgeries. I am slowly recovering. My doctor had me quit smoking cigarettes. He has me on Chantix. Here I am fighting the craving of wanting to smoke and fighting the pain of recovering from my surgeries. I was tested and found out that I have asthma and have to use twice daily Albuterol inhaler. My doctor wants me to lose weight! Eat right! Not smoke!

I faced many fears and challenging in my life. Having the confidence in myself and those that surrounded me gave me the strength and support that I needed in my time of need. Fear can be a good thing! Yes as crazy as it may seem, fear is often a great motivator to jump start you to seriously think about your life, your family, your job and your goals.

It does not make one less a person if they have fear. Fear is normal. Fear can be good. Everyone has some sort of fear. If they say they don’t, they are lying to you. With 47 years as a practitioner of Shizenki Ryu Bujutsu karate, I will be the first to tell you, I am no Superman. My life experience has given me the pathway to move forward and over come many fears and many obstacles. These obstacles I had to over come, made me a better person. Do I like having to face fears? No! Do I like the confidence that develops from meeting my fears and lives obstacles? Of course I do! It has helped in various other lives adventures.

 


                                  

                                                          By: Lewis Whitney, Soke, Ni Dai

                                                         10th Degree Black Belt, Head

                                                         Of Family, Kenshi Ryu Karate 

                                     

ルイスホイットニー

Hanbo & Tanto

Part 2

 

The exercises in part one of this series were designed to give the student an insight into the flexibility and vast array of techniques of the Hanbo. The principle understanding here should be that of the weapons becoming an extension of the body, and being used to extend to the range and power of its capabilities. 

 

The next stage of learning and practice enables the student to experiment further with the body/weapon relationship with a view to increasing flexibility, creativity and speed of response. To this end, the exercises should now be tried with a blade or wooden knife tucked into the obi. It is important to widen the potential responses using the weapons while working in paired practice. 

Rather than trying to memorize specific techniques, experiment with the following possibilities. For example: encourage yourself to look and feel for the other weapon. Are there opportunities to draw your blade? Can't his blade be thrown to distract your opponent before using the staff? How can you draw your blade when at close range? Above all, think laterally: if the Hanbo functions as an extra or extended limb, is a blade a cutting/stabbing weapon only, or can its hilt be used to strike or even add power to a lock?

 

It is often said the art of the Hanbo originated from improvised tactics using broken spears or sword scabbards. The warrior’s intention was to make the most of these weapons in order to survive on the battlefield. In this tradition, the Hanbo can be seen as a means to an end, and more emphasis is being laid here on principles of use rather than on specific Kata style techniques. 

 

In the following exercises no attempt will be made to outline blade techniques. These should be taught by a responsible and skilled instructor and only taught to trusted and responsible students. All exercises, like actual techniques should be practiced in an alert but relaxed fashion. Distance is the most important aspect here and will be taught to students by their instructor. 

 

Exercise One:

 

Attack: straight or roundhouse strike.

Defense: step back, then block and strike. 

 

Note the opportunities that then present themselves for you to draw and strike, using either Hanbo or Tanto. Should you move away or into the attacker? Look for opportunities that present themselves and will increase your advantage. 

 

Exercise Two: 

 

Attack: straight or roundhouse strike with a weapon.

Defense: shift your focus to the weapon arm or wrist to disable it.

 

Go back to the first exercise and remember what you did without your attacker having a weapon and open your mind to various techniques that will enable you to disarm your attacker and end the confrontation. As with all practice, start slowly and build up confidence and expertise, remembering to relax and stay mentally and physically calm and flexible. 

 

No two scenarios are exactly the same. Likewise no two responses are the same either. All training should also take place on your weak side so as not to become one sided and leave you with major weak points. 

 

I for one always have a knife with me and learned many years ago how to use it properly from an expert in knife fighting, a former British SAS Commando. Make sure as you learn the use of the Hanbo and Tanto that you take it seriously as both are extremely lethal weapons in the right hands.

 

 

 

 


 

 

                                                    By: Soke, Sai Dai,

                                                                                  Avelino R. Mayoral

                                                                        Kyoshi, Paula Whitney,

                                                                                  6th Dan Black Belt

 

 

Kyoshi, Paula Whitney has never allowed physical obstacles to become a barrier for her. As a practitioner of the martial arts, she has met some very challenging obstacles, but as many may not know, Paula done all this with some very life threatening health issues. She and her husband, Louis both fought through each medical issue that she faced. As a female practitioner of the martial arts she could be an inspiration for all practitioners of the martial arts.

 

The S.M.K. is like a brotherhood. Paula Whitney is like our sister. We can only hope that her health gets better. We want her to be around for many years to come. As a female in a male predominantly practice art, Paula has faced many obstacles that she fought to over come and fighting her health problems surely has shown that she is truly a legitimate force to acknowledge.

 

Paula…we all want you to get better!

 

Your friend,

Soke, San Dai, Judan Black Belt

Shizenki Ryu Bujutsu,

Avelino R. Mayoral  

 

Third Issue 

Soke Menkyo Kai

May 2012 Newsletter

 

 

 

Inside Stories

 

1)    Note: 3

2)    False Claims: 4

3)    Jeff’s Taekwondo System: 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: The S.M.K. Newsletter is published every January, May and September of each year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illustrator & Text Designer:         Avelino R. Mayoral, Soke San Dai, Shizenki Ryu Bujutsu Karate                                          

 

Editor:                                               Avelino R. Mayoral

 

 

 

 

 

Soke Menkyo Kai President/Founder: Donald P. Jeffrey, Soke shodai, Soke Nidai, Soke Godai

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2011 Soke Menkyo Kai. All rights reserved. Except as permitted by current law, no part of this newsletter may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system mechanically or electronically, without prior written permission of the copyright owner. Contact: PMB 775, Bldg 645, G Street, Suite 100, Anchorage, AK, 99501

 


 

Note…

 

Welcome to our thrid issue of the Soke Menkyo Kai Newsletter. Since the last newsletter things in the S.M.K. (Soke Menkyo Kai) has changed. We are going to get a new S.M.K. web site and our President, Donald P. Jeffrey in the past year has faced many obstacles with these changes. All S.M.K. members are looking forward to 2012 being a big year for the S.M.K.

It is safe to say, that each of the members are hoping that 2012 is a prosperios year. As with any change, new ideas, new development and the hopes of success face the S.M.K. Each of us as S.M.K. members knows the responsibilities not only as leaders in our Ryu, but as active members in the S.M.K. to always seek new members.

With any organization, the organization is only as strong as the members who are a part of the organization. Who every stated big is better, must have not legitimately researched other larger Sokeships. We are not here to judge. We all know of at least one Sokeship that has a high percentage of members. Ask yourself this question: “does having a large percentage of members in a Sokeship make them better?

The S.M.K. is kept small because it keeps out the fly-by-night martial artist who gets their black belt ranks by self-promotion, having other martial artists promote them to what ever rank their money can pay for. Plus lately many martial arts practitioners are calling themselves Doctor! Yes Doctor!

It was P.T. Barnum who made the statement: “There is a sucker born every minute!” but in business there is another statement that goes like this: Caveat Emptor: “let the buyer beware!” This is good to understand. Now…if we as learders of our Ryu use both of these wise statements in our teachings, we become wise to the things in our life and our teachings of our Ryu.

The S.M.K. needs to follow this because in the past (Donald Jeffrey) can back me up on this, some practitioners would try in test Donald Jeffrey’s commitment to accepting only legitimate Sokes into the S.M.K. Sadly as each and everyone of us in the S.M.K. know, making claims to titles, ranks to bogus degrees, bogus ranks are fooling no one!  

 

Sincerely,

Soke, Avelino R. Mayoral, Hanshi

Menkyo Kaiden, Shizenki Ryu Bujutsu

 


 

                                 By: Soke San Dai, Avelino R. Mayoral

                                                                   Shizenki Ryu Bujutsu Karate

 

 

False Claims…

 

Accreditation means that a school has been evaluated by education authorities, to ensure it is offering high quality learning opportunities. Why worry about your educational having Regional or National Accreditation? I came up on a very interesting, scholarly web site that gives all the details of how important it is in education for a college, a university to be regionally or nationally accredited. The bottomline here is, no marial arts federation, has national or regional accredition, which in turn, means any martial art Ryu, martial arts federations issuing these bogus PH.Ds are hoping that they are never going to get questioned.

 

As stated in the Notes of the issue of the S.M.K. newsletter, Caveat Emptor: “let the buyer beware!” I personally believe that those in the martial arts have a clue that if a orgaination in the martial arts to inclued sensei’s or martial arts organizations give away Ph.D’s, these organizations are no better then the statement made by  P.T. Barnum who made the statement: “There is a sucker born every minute!”

 

It is a shame that these practitioners who are into the martial arts for just the money, just the certificates, just for bogus black belt ranks, even fall for this kind of business practice. Please do not get me wrong, we all like being acknowledged for our legitimate achievements. But come on…buying your rank! Buying outragious titles! Don’t these people have a clue, there are legitimate individuals that go to college, work their rear ends off, put up with the instructors, take all the test, meet all the qualifications to get their degree?

 

In the past oh I would say, maybe 25-to-30 years in the martial arts, you have every Tom, Dick and Harry making bogus claims to titles, ranks, and even achievements that you almost are required to question. What ever happened to honest practitioners? Are martial artist so fooled by more means better?

 

First of all any college degree being issued by a martial arts federation or a martial arts instructor, first and foremost should set off a red flag! Then there is the issue of professing yourself as a 11th, 12th dan black belt! Oh My God!! What’s next….calling yourself…oh let’s see! How about supreme ruler? One thing that so many martial artist tend to over look is, you maybe a black belt in one Ryu, but your rank may not be worth a cup of coffee in another Ryu. So if all this comes down to working hard, putting in your time, basically paying your dues to be call a legitimate Ph.D don’t you think, just maybe, when or if you really earned the rank, the title, the acheivement you profess, give you the self-confidence, the knowledge, the skill, of what you are professing yourself as?

 

It is to the point now in the martial arts, that no one is no longer happy at just being a black belt! Let me ask you this question: each of us been in the martial arts for over 30 to 40 years (some of us longer) do we really need to make ourselves feel that more important?

 

The bottomline here is don’t profess anything that you are not willing to prove. Example to this is: all living humans in the world must have a legitimate birth certicate! Ask yourself this question: would you go to high school if the high school did not issue you a high school diploma? How about those of us who are married? We all have a marriage license! How about those of us, who work most of our life, would you work in a job that after 35 to 40 years, you discover you are not going to receive a pension from? We all want to be rewarded for the things we do in life. However there are some who still believe seeking easy avenues to their goals is the best way to reach them. I am not talking about those of us who really earn what we put our time, our life into.

 

Just think back to grade school when that big kid who went around believing he was a tough guy. Sooner or later someone had to face him. Let me say this, often bullies such as the one that I mentioned find, that it is not always another big kid that will beat him up. It maybe that smaller kid who know one believes can defend himself. The bully gets proven by the smaller kid that he is not what he claims to be. We have to really watch out of the things we say, we do, and how we represent ourselves.

 

If earning a degree that is legitimate through a university or college is your goal, then it is important to know if the degree you are trying to obtain will be regionally or nationally accredited. No martial arts organization can issue college degrees. Of course anyone with a computer and the right software can make-up any kind of fraudulent degree, martial arts certificate, even to the point, where some may believe the degree or certificate is legitimate. However keep in mind, the two statements that was made earlier: 1) “there is a sucker born every minute!” 2) Caveat Emptor!”

 

Respectfully,

 

Soke San Dai, Avelino R. Mayoral

Shizenki Ryu Bujutsu

 

 

 

 

Reference

 

Regional Accreditution VS. National Accreditation, retrieved May 8, 2012, from http://www.elearners.com/guide/online-colleges-universities-and-schools/regional-accreditation-vs-national-accreditation/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeffrey Cuevas, Soke Nidai

 

 

Jeff’s Taekwondo System…

 

 

 

Chang-Han

 

 

I.T.F

 

 

Tae Kwon Do

 

White Belt

 

Basics

 

WHITE BELT YELLOW STRIPE            

 

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

 

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

 

White Tiger meditation #1

 

Form: Chon JI

 

Yellow Belt

 

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

 

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

 

Form: Tan Gun

Orange Belt

 

 

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

 

 

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

 

 

Kicking combination #1

 

 

Form: To San

 

Green Belt

 

 

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

 

 

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

 

 

Kicking combination #2

 

 

Form: Won Hyo

 

 

 Blue Belt

 

 

Intermediate hand/foot techniques

 

 

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

 

 

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

 

 

Kicking combination #3

 

 

Form: Yul Gok

 

 

Purple Belt

 

 

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

 

 

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

 

 

Kicking Combination #4

 

 

Form: Joong Gun

 

 

Brown Belt

 

 

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

 

 

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

 

 

Kicking Combination #5

 

 

Form: Toi Gye

 

 

2nd Brown Belt

 

 

Advance Techniques’ of hand and foot.

 

 

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

 

 

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

 

 

Form: Hwa Rang,Choong Mu

 

 

 

 

 

1st Brown Belt

 

 

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

 

 

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

 

 

Forms: Kwang Gae, Po Eun

 

 

Traditional

 

 

1st Dan Black Belt: Ge Baek, Chang Jang

 

 

2nd Dan Black Belt:  Ko Dang, Yoo Sin

 

 

3RD Dan Black Belt: Se Jong, Ul Ji

 

 

4th Dan Black Belt:  Choi Young

 

 

5th Dan Black Belt: Sam Il

 

 

6th Dan and above Black Belt:  Tong Il

 

 

J.L. Cuevas, Instructor

 

 

Soke of the Shoshin  Kempo Jutsu system

 

 

Instructor of Tae Kwon Do (Chang Han)

 

 

 Belt Ranking System

 

 

 

For intermediate and high ranking students to achieve the next full belt color, they must pass through designated levels of knowledge. Understand that each earned level is a passing rank. It may take several months to years to pass from level one to the next colored belt.

 

 

 

Rank Philosophy

 

 

I have a unique ranking system consisting of ten belts from white to black. All instructional methods, procedures and systems are geared towards children, teens, and adults.

 

My philosophy for teaching belt ranks is divided into three phases (Beginner, Intermediate & Advanced). Beginner ranks include white thru green belts; Intermediate ranks include green thru purple belts; High or Advanced ranks includes brown belts & above.

 

The primary objective for beginner rank students is to teach safety awareness and basic self-defense techniques. The secondary objective for beginner students is to teach the formal aspects of martial arts such as basic techniques (strikes, kicks, blocks, stances). Perfection of techniques is not required for promotional testing of beginner ranks. Teaching children how to stay safe in today’s world is the objective.

 

 

 

 

 

At intermediate ranks, the primary objective becomes improving basic techniques such as kicks, blocks, strikes, and defense against grabs and other attacks. Basic Hyung knowledge, beginning one step skills, improved concentration, and a greater demonstration of martial arts discipline are expected at this level also.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The primary objective for advanced rank students is to enforce the formal aspect of the martial art; blocks, kicks, strikes, stances, hyungs, self-defense techniques, one-steps, sparring, martial art etiquette, and discipline. The secondary objective for high ranking students is reviewing safety awareness topics. Promotional testing for high ranking students is based upon effectively demonstrating proper technique and form of the primary objectives.

 

IMPORTANT REMINDER: Students must have perfect attendance in order to test for rank promotion.

 

 

Rank Promotion

 

 

At the correct time and only at the Masters discretion, students are evaluated on the techniques and skills they have learned. Students then advance to the next belt rank. The advancement fee is $50.00 to $200.00. The fee is for testing only; belts will be awarded free of charge. Rank requirements will be passed out during the semester by the instructor.

 

 

 Karate Tournament

 

All Karate students are invited to attend and compete in the Karate Tournament (attendance is optional) to be held later in the semester. The tournament is a great learning experience for all students as it promotes competitive spirit, self-confidence and fun! Events will be split according to age, size and/or belt rank, depending on the event. There will be a nominal fee to participate in the Tournament. This helps pay for the cost of the facility, awards, and staff.

 

Sparring

 

As students advance in rank they are taught sparring and hyungs. Sparring is light-contact controlled fighting, which is highly recommended for students advancing. Students will learn how to use their techniques in actual self-defense and sport scenarios. Actual self-defense scenarios include how to defend against a multi-person attack, and defending against various other attacks. Sport scenarios include tournament preparation, competition rules & regulations, and sportsmanship.

 

Sparring is open to student’s ranked yellow and above. Sparring is mandatory for student’s ranked orange belt & above.

 

All students participating in sparring must have the following gear: Hand Pads, Foot Pads, Mouth Piece, Cup & Support (males), Head gear and Shin Guards. Green belt students & above must have their own sparring armor including headgear and body armor. Purple belt students & above, are required to purchase full-faced headgear and body armor.

 

Hyungs

 

Hyungs (also called forms) are pre-arranged martial arts techniques combined together in a floor pattern designed to represent fighting off imaginary attackers. As students progress they will be taught the practical application, of the Hyungs.

 

Weapons Training

 

Please see your instructor for details on rank and equipment requirements.

 

 

TONFA CLASS-50.00 Monthly

 

 

BO CLASS-50.00 Monthly

 

 

Uniforms

 

 

Students are mandated to have the proper school karate uniform, which provides comfort and freedom of movement.

 

Recommended Items

 

Karate Workbook (No longer available)

an essential item for all students! Instructor curriculums will correspond to certain pages of the workbook to aid parents and students with practice.

Shin Pads

Highly recommended for students participating in sparring class. Shin Pads will prevent painful blows to the shin.

Training Equipment

Training Equipment for home practice can improve your child’s ability and coordination!

Forearm Pads

Recommended protecting the forearms when practicing blocking and self-defense partner drills.

 

 *Optional Program*

 

Medals of Honor

 

 

Perfect Attendance: Student must have perfect attendance and have all the attributes of the top students and PA, no limit

 

 

Top Students: Student must maintain good attendance, good attitude, and moral virtue and follow the tenets of the Martial Arts as well as the school KUN. Five per class

 

 

  Perfect Attitude: Student must have a perfect attitude towards training and life. And have all the attributes of the top students. Five per class

 

 

Student of the class: Student must have earned all the awards of a P-Attendance-P-Attitude-Top Students. One per class

 

 

Student of the semester: Student must have the quality of character that the Master sees as the best and must have earned one of each of the medals listed, one per semester student of the year: Must Have Earned Everything!

 

 

Martial Arts Oath…

 

 

I shall observe the tenets of Martial Arts

 

 

I shall respect my instructors and seniors

 

 

I shall never misuse my Martial Arts

 

 

I shall be a champion of freedom and justice

 

 

I shall build a more peaceful world

 

 

Tenets of Martial Arts

 

 

Courtesy, Integrity, Perseverance, Self control

 

 

Indomitable spirit

 

Chang-Han

I.T.F

Tae Kwon Do

 

White Belt

Basics

WHITE BELT YELLOW STRIPE

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

White Tiger meditation #1

Form: Chon JI

 

Yellow Belt

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

Form: Tan Gun

 

Orange Belt

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

Kicking combination #1

Form: To San

 

Green Belt

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

Kicking combination #2

Form: Won Hyo

 

Blue Belt

Intermediate hand/foot techniques

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

Kicking combination #3

Form: Yul Gok

 

Purple Belt

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

Kicking Combination #4

Form: Joong Gun

 

Brown Belt

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

Kicking Combination #5

Form: Toi Gye

 

2nd Brown Belt

Advance Techniques’ of hand and foot.

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

Form: Hwa Rang,Choong Mu

 

1st Brown Belt

Self Defense maneuvers 1 thru 5

One Step Sparring 1 thru 5

Forms: Kwang Gae, Po Eun

 

Traditional

1st Dan Black Belt: Ge Baek, Chang Jang

2nd Dan Black Belt:  Ko Dang, Yoo Sin

3RD Dan Black Belt: Se Jong, Ul Ji

4th Dan Black Belt:  Choi Young

5th Dan Black Belt: Sam Il

6th Dan and above Black Belt:  Tong Il

J.L. Cuevas, Instructor

Soke of the Shoshin  Kempo Jutsu system

Instructor of Tae Kwon Do (Chang Han)

 

 

 

 

 

Belt Ranking System


For intermediate and high ranking students to achieve the next full belt color, they must pass through designated levels of knowledge. Understand that each earned level is a passing rank. It may take several months to years to pass from level one to the next colored belt.

Rank Philosophy

I have a unique ranking system consisting of ten belts from white to black. All instructional methods, procedures and systems are geared towards children, teens, and adults.

My philosophy for teaching belt ranks is divided into three phases (Beginner, Intermediate & Advanced). Beginner ranks include white thru green belts; Intermediate ranks include green thru purple belts; High or Advanced ranks includes brown belts & above.

The primary objective for beginner rank students is to teach safety awareness and basic self-defense techniques. The secondary objective for beginner students is to teach the formal aspects of martial arts such as basic techniques (strikes, kicks, blocks, stances). Perfection of techniques is not required for promotional testing of beginner ranks. Teaching children how to stay safe in today’s world is the objective.



At intermediate ranks, the primary objective becomes improving basic techniques such as kicks, blocks, strikes, and defense against grabs and other attacks. Basic Hyung knowledge, beginning one step skills, improved concentration, and a greater demonstration of martial arts discipline are expected at this level also.


 


The primary objective for advanced rank students is to enforce the formal aspect of the martial art; blocks, kicks, strikes, stances, hyungs, self-defense techniques, one-steps, sparring, martial art etiquette, and discipline. The secondary objective for high ranking students is reviewing safety awareness topics. Promotional testing for high ranking students is based upon effectively demonstrating proper technique and form of the primary objectives.

IMPORTANT REMINDER: Students must have perfect attendance in order to test for rank promotion.

Rank Promotion

At the correct time and only at the Masters discretion, students are evaluated on the techniques and skills they have learned. Students then advance to the next belt rank. The advancement fee is $50.00 to $200.00. The fee is for testing only; belts will be awarded free of charge. Rank requirements will be passed out during the semester by the instructor.

 

 

 

 Karate Tournament

All Karate students are invited to attend and compete in the Karate Tournament (attendance is optional) to be held later in the semester. The tournament is a great learning experience for all students as it promotes competitive spirit, self-confidence and fun! Events will be split according to age, size and/or belt rank, depending on the event. There will be a nominal fee to participate in the Tournament. This helps pay for the cost of the facility, awards, and staff.


Sparring

As students advance in rank they are taught sparring and hyungs. Sparring is light-contact controlled fighting, which is highly recommended for students advancing. Students will learn how to use their techniques in actual self-defense and sport scenarios. Actual self-defense scenarios include how to defend against a multi-person attack, and defending against various other attacks. Sport scenarios include tournament preparation, competition rules & regulations, and sportsmanship.

Sparring is open to student’s ranked yellow and above. Sparring is mandatory for student’s ranked orange belt & above.


All students participating in sparring must have the following gear: Hand Pads, Foot Pads, Mouth Piece, Cup & Support (males), Head gear and Shin Guards. Green belt students & above must have their own sparring armor including headgear and body armor. Purple belt students & above, are required to purchase full-faced headgear and body armor.

 



 

 

Hyungs

 

Hyungs (also called forms) are pre-arranged martial arts techniques combined together in a floor pattern designed to represent fighting off imaginary attackers. As students progress they will be taught the practical application, of the Hyungs.


Weapons Training

 

Please see your instructor for details on rank and equipment requirements.

TONFA CLASS-50.00 Monthly

BO CLASS-50.00 Monthly

 

 

 


Uniforms

Students are mandated to have the proper school karate uniform, which provides comfort and freedom of movement.


Recommended Items


Karate Workbook (No longer available)

an essential item for all students! Instructor curriculums will correspond to certain pages of the workbook to aid parents and students with practice.
Shin Pads
Highly recommended for students participating in sparring class. Shin Pads will prevent painful blows to the shin.
Training Equipment
Training Equipment for home practice can improve your child’s ability and coordination!
Forearm Pads
Recommended protecting the forearms when practicing blocking and self-defense partner drills.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Optional Program

Medals of Honor

Perfect Attendance: Student must have perfect attendance and have all the attributes of the top students and PA, no limit

Top Students: Student must maintain good attendance, good attitude, and moral virtue and follow the tenets of the Martial Arts as well as the school KUN. Five per class

  Perfect Attitude: Student must have a perfect attitude towards training and life. And have all the attributes of the top students. Five per class

Student of the class: Student must have earned all the awards of a P-Attendance-P-Attitude-Top Students. One per class

Student of the semester: Student must have the quality of character that the Master sees as the best and must have earned one of each of the medals listed, one per semester

Student of the year: Must Have Earned Everything!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martial Arts Oath

I shall observe the tenets of Martial Arts

I shall respect my instructors and seniors

I shall never misuse my Martial Arts

I shall be a champion of freedom and justice

I shall build a more peaceful world

Tenets of Martial Arts

Courtesy, Integrity, Perseverance, Self control

Indomitable spirit

 

 

School Kun

1.     I Will Respect My Parents

2.     I Will Listen To My Teachers

3.     I Will Never Misuse My Martial Art

Respecting Parents

1.      Never argue with parents

2.      Always obey your parents

3.      Assist your parents when needed.

Listening to Teachers

1.      Never interrupt your teacher

2.      Always pay attention to your teacher

3.      Practice what you learn

Misusing Martial Arts

1.      I will never start a fight

2.      I will not become a bully

3.      I will only use my Martial Arts to protect myself

 

 

School Kun

 

 

1.     I Will Respect My Parents

 

 

2.     I Will Listen To My Teachers

 

 

3.     I Will Never Misuse My Martial Art

 

 

Respecting Parents

 

 

1.      Never argue with parents

 

 

2.      Always obey your parents

 

 

3.      Assist your parents when needed.

 

 

Listening to Teachers

 

 

1.      Never interrupt your teacher

 

 

2.      Always pay attention to your teacher

 

 

3.      Practice what you learn

 

 

Misusing Martial Arts

 

 

1.      I will never start a fight

 

 

2.      I will not become a bully

 

3.      I will only use my Martial Arts to protect myself

 

Soke Acknowledgements:

 

 

 

 

Soke Sandai, Avelino R. Mayoral, Shizenki Ryu Bujutsu: 宗家三代 市長, 龍武術

 

 

Soke Nidai, Jeff Cuevas: 宗家、ジェフ ・ クエバス

 

 

Soke Menkyo Kai President/founder,  Soke Shodai, Soke Nidai, Soke Godai, Donald Jeffrey: 宗家免許会会長/創設者、宗家小代、宗家 、宗家五代

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2012, Avelino R. Mayoral